In 1945 the Original Agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States Was to

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In 1945, the original agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States was to divide Germany and Austria into four occupation zones. This agreement, known as the Yalta Agreement, was signed in February of 1945 by the leaders of the three major Allied powers: Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

The Yalta Agreement was the result of negotiations that took place during the Yalta Conference, which was held in February of 1945 in Yalta, Crimea. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the post-war reorganization of Europe and to plan the defeat of Nazi Germany.

Under the terms of the Yalta Agreement, Germany was divided into four occupation zones, with the Soviet Union taking control of the eastern part of the country and the United States, Britain, and France each taking control of a portion of western Germany. Austria was also divided into four occupation zones, with the Soviet Union, the United States, Britain, and France each taking control of a portion of the country.

The Yalta Agreement also established the United Nations, which was intended to be a successor to the League of Nations and to promote international cooperation and peace. The leaders of the three Allied powers also agreed to cooperate in ending the war with Japan, which would involve the Soviet Union joining the war against Japan after the defeat of Germany.

While the Yalta Agreement was viewed as a major achievement at the time, it was also controversial. Some critics argue that the United States and Britain made too many concessions to the Soviet Union, allowing it to take control of much of Eastern Europe and laying the groundwork for the Cold War.

In conclusion, the Yalta Agreement of 1945 was a significant agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States. It established the division of Germany and Austria into four occupation zones and laid the groundwork for the United Nations. While the agreement was controversial, it played a major role in shaping the post-war world.